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Book Club No. 17



Hello lovely folk, today I'm back with a book review post for you all. This is an all-round "good books" review which is fab as that's not always the case for Book Club but, I've read some great things recently. If you're a fellow fan of graphic novels/comics then you'll be pleased to know, I've got you covered in this post too! So let's get into the reviews:

Library of Souls: The Third Novel of Miss Peregrine's Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
Oh man you guys, where do I even start with this? If you've been a reader for a while, you will know that I'm a *huge* fan of this series and really enjoyed the first and second books a lot so it's probably no surprise that the third instalment also really floated my boat.

I'm not going to explain the back story or general plot too much as I already have here, but this is such a great third and "final" book. I say "final" because it's been recently announced that Ransom Riggs is actually releasing the 4th book so I'm mega excited, but the 4th book is the start of a new trilogy set in the United States rather than the UK. This book is still following the trip in London that the children are going through to find their beloved ymbryne, Miss Peregrine, after she is stolen away along with the other ymbrynes. Library of Souls goes down the more fantasy route whereas, despite the main characters being magical with amazing varying powers that defy logic and all odds, the other books are set in more realistic environments and circumstances. Library of Souls however spends the majority of the story in a peculiar-only zone/town and part of me feels that a small reason for that is this book can get dark and the magic kind of softens the blow.

The gang that you follow throughout the series get separated for a lot of this book which I completely understand why as it fits the narrative and plot, but I was kind of disappointed because the group as a whole work so well together that I often felt like I was missing characters: Enoch's sarcasm or Bronwyn's care and consideration mainly. Despite this though, it's a great way to explore Jacob's - the main character - thoughts and feelings towards things seemingly coming to a close and him dealing with how much power, influence, and friendship he has built. It gets quite dark as the violence is stepped up a notch and Riggs describes this really well by keeping it suitable for young adults but also making it suitably harrowing at the same time. New characters were introduced into this third book too and I was not mad about it - Sharon is a fucking great character and I hope he has a little cameo in the next trilogy. Overall, the book did a fine job bringing this epic adventure to a close without dulling the opportunity for future escapades and although I would still say the second book (Hollow City) was my favourite, this one still gripped me and had me guessing throughout whilst also turning each page hoping and praying that my favourite characters wouldn't meet their end.

The one problem I had with it, that I weirdly didn't have with the other two books, was the fact that Riggs uses old photographs throughout the book to give you an idea of what particular characters look like. He has stated before that he does this as he's been influenced by these old photos from garage/yard sales and wanted to use them in his stories. Obviously, some of them have been altered to match his characters as well, but it just didn't seem to flow as well in this book. Sometimes it came across as if characters were just included momentarily as some sort of filler just so the photo would make sense, rather than them being central to the narrative. This isn't something that ruins the story at all, it's just something that distracted me as a reader from the plot at times which is a shame. However like I said, I recommend this book and the whole trilogy very highly. Grab your own copy here for £5.58



Injection Volume 2 by Warren Ellis
Somehow, it's been two years since I read the first Injection volume and boy oh boy am I pleased I've got back to this story. I'll quickly give you some backstory: Injection focuses on five specialist individuals who are brought together by the British government to theorize about human culture and why society is progressing and changing the way that it is in the 21st century. They then create an artificial intelligence that is a mix of shamanism and technology which essentially poisons the world in response to their theories and hypotheses. Injection really begins when the group has disbanded and then are being brought back together to try and stop the havoc the intelligence is starting to reek on the planet.

The second volume obviously explores some of the main characters a lot more which is great, and also develops the story so you can begin to understand more about Injection/the poison/the artificial intelligence and how it has grown and learned things to develop itself. This second instalment was just as gripping as the first and had some excellent scenes of humour which I always feel steps up graphic novels that little bit extra as they can jump from funny to serious in a page turn or strip. The artwork in Injection is also really good and fits the genre and mood of the comic well. After reading this second volume, I feel that Injection is a bit of a slow burn overall despite the first two collections being really hard-hitting with twists in the plot, but generally speaking, I feel like it's all building to a huge crescendo at the end which will be epic (or that's what I'm hoping at least). If you like comics that have a sci-fi feel but with elements of superstition, horror, and mythology thrown in there for good measure, you are bound to love this. Volume 3 is also out now and Volume 4 will be released next month so get on it quick! Get your paperback copy for £11.78 here



The Knife of Never Letting Go: The First Novel of Chaos Walking by Patrick Ness
I know I said it earlier, but honestly, I don't know where to start with this one, gang. I got this book (along with the next two in the trilogy) from Matt for my birthday and holy shit. I didn't know what to expect, but it's fair to say, it's ended in love after this first book. Patrick Ness wrote one of my favourite books that made me ball like a baby in public the first time I read it, so I was so excited to get stuck into The Knife of Never Letting Go. This series follows a young boy named Todd Hewitt who lives in a backwater town called Prentisstown. This town is on New World - a planet which some humans decided to move to and colonise as they wanted to get back to a simple way of living - and to Todd's knowledge, it's the only town which has survived after the war with the aliens who lived here called the Spackle.

Prentisstown is unique as towns go as it consists on solely men and boys who are taught from a young age that the greatest goal in life is becoming a man; something which little Todd Hewitt is a matter of a days away from and he is dying for it to happen as he is the last boy in the town to enter manhood. Another major factor in Prentisstown is that no one's thoughts are true feelings are entirely theirs to keep to themselves because of the Noise. At the start of the story, Todd explains that the Noise was a weapon the Spackle unleashed on the humans which means that their thoughts are constantly active and visible/audible for all those nearby to see and hear. It has colours, it can be hard to control if you are feeling emotional at all, and it means that the centre of town for instance, can give you a real bad head as there's never any silence. Todd lives on a farm with his adoptive guardians - Ben and Cillian - who promised Todd's deceased parents that they would care for him.

When Todd discovers something in the swamp, he can't keep his wandering mind quiet and his Noise lets slip what he found and his whole life snowballs into escape, danger, and confusion. When I first started reading this book, I instantly thought "oh no" as Todd's character and many of the Prentisstown men's speech is written with an accent: so "you" is written "yer"... you get the idea. I usually hate this as I'm a slow reader as it is, but having elements like this in books makes it even more difficult for me to rattle through them but surprisingly, I grew to love it in this book as it gave me so much more of an idea of Todd as a character. I don't really want to say much more about the plot because it will give away all the surprise and suspense, but this book is amazing for creating drama and leaving you constantly on a cliffhanger at the end of each chapter (including the last chapter - goddamn you, Ness). The characters in the story are so easy to picture in the mind and you get really attached to some whilst others you have a real distain for and it makes ploughing through the story all that more enjoyable.

If you're someone who usually overlooks YA fiction, you *have* to give this book a shot because I feel that Ness is such a talented writer that he puts some adult fiction writers to shame. He creates such a harrowing, dark, terrifying, yet empathetic and beautiful story that I'd be surprised if anyone said they didn't like this at all. I can't wait to dive into book two of trilogy, I'm just building myself up to it because it's a long one. You honestly have to grab this book - it's only £5.73 here




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