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Having a Sustainable Halloween: Recipes for Using up your Pumpkin



Halloween is one of the best parts of the year - don't @ me trying to tell me any different. But guess what? This goth for life has never carved a pumpkin til this year. I know, you're all utterly horrified but, it's just the way it's always been! I remember carving a turnip when I was younger (shout out to fellow working class folk who grew up doing this because it was the cheaper alternative) but, this year I wanted to finally sit down and complete this main Halloween tradition properly. Something that I wanted to make sure I did whilst carving though is make sure I used up as much of the pumpkin as possible. Many times I've witnessed pumpkin carving going on and all the good bits inside have made their way swiftly to the bin. What a waste. Pumpkin is *such* a comforting and nutritious food - here's just some of its benefits:
- high in Vitamin A
- also full of various other vitamins for improving immunity
- nutrients that promote healthy skin
- high anti-oxidant content for reducing risk of chronic illness
- full of nutrients that can protect eyesight

So, I think we can all agree that pumpkin can really pack a punch. With all the benefits of it in mind, and the fact that I didn't want to waste any perfectly good food just for the sake of a carving, Matt came up with the idea of posting about a sustainable Halloween. And that was that. So, I came up with a couple of recipes for both the inside and out so I could truly benefit from ticking this tradition off my list of things to try. If you want to eat some scrummy food and also pamper your skin for a low price and to make your Halloween carving time a little more sustainable and waste-free then just keep on reading! (Please note: one of the best things you can do is carve out as much pumpkin flesh as you can before doing your actual carving. This will a) give you some flesh to work with during your pumpkin being used for Halloween and b) make it easier for you to carve. It's also worth noting that one of these recipes requires chopped pieces of pumpkin so cutting up your jack-o-lantern before it goes bad is worth it for that particular recipe! And shout out to Matt for being a source of grand ideas. You can all thank him for this. )



Curried Pumpkin Soup & Curried Seed Crunch - Vegan & Low Calorie
This recipe is a fool-proof option and a great autumn warmer. Pumpkin doesn't hold a lot of taste on it's own which makes it a great base ingredient for soups, stews and curries. I use US "cup measurements for this as it's easier to keep track of the ratios of ingredients. This soup is packed full of veggies and great flavouring that tallies up to just 161 calories per portion and uses up the flesh and the seeds of the pumpkin!

Calories: 161 per person | Serves: 2 (generously)

Ingredients
For the soup:
- 1 tbsp of oil of your choice for frying
- 1 regular-sized yellow onion, sliced
- 3 cups of pumpkin, chopped or carved out
- 1 cup of carrots, chopped
- 3 garlic cloves, minced
- 1 tbsp of fresh ginger, minced (ground ginger or paste works too!)
- 1 tbsp of curry powder
- 1 tsp of ground cumin
- salt & pepper
- 1 litre of vegetable stock (or chicken if you're not veggie/vegan!)

For the seeds:
- 1 cup of clean pumpkin seeds
- 1/2 tsp of oil of your choice
- 1 tsp of curry powder
- 1 tsp of fajita seasoning or cayenne pepper
- salt & pepper



Instructions
For the soup:
1. Add some oil to a deep pan on a med-high heat ready to saute the onions. Cook them through until they start to go translucent (about 5-6 mins).
2. Add the garlic and ginger and carry on cooking for a couple of minutes.
3. Now add the carrot, pumpkin, curry powder, and cumin. Stir through.
4. Pop in the vegetable/chicken stock and bring to the boil. Now reduce the heat and leave it to cook through with the lid on for 20 minutes.
5. Once the vegetables have softened, pop it all in a liquidiser or use a handheld one to whizz-up the ingredients. Pulse the ingredients to a texture of your liking for soup (I like mine quite liquid rather than chunky!) and add salt and pepper to taste.

For the seeds:
1. Preheat the oven to 190c.
2. Toss the seeds, oil, and spices in a bowl.
3. Place some baking paper on a baking tray and lay the seeds on it in one flat layer.
4. Bake for around 8-10 minutes. Check on them occasionally and move them around if need be until they are browned and smell delicious! You can also pop them under the grill to get them really crisp.



Easy Peasy Pumpkin Pie with Maple Cream - Easy & Vegetarian
This one is a new one for me as previously, I had never tried pumpkin pie! It's a very rich and indulgent dessert but is a very autumn/winter appropriate sweet option that has a festive feel. I've made it easy with ready-made pastry and I didn't even have a proper tart cake tin - so this is proof that you can make do with what's in your cupboards (including making it vegan if you can find good single and double cream substitutes!)

Calories: 585 | Serves: 6-8 (depending on serving size)

Ingredients
For the pie:
- Ready-to-roll shortcrust pastry
- 6 cups of pumpkin, peeled & chopped/carved
- 3 eggs
- 1/3 cup of butter, melted
- 150ml of single cream
- 1 cup of muscovado sugar (light or dark - I only had dark in stock!)
- 1 tsp of cinnamon
- 1/2 tsp of ginger
- 1 tsp of nutmeg

For the maple cream topping:
- 1 small tub of double cream (I used Emlea 284ml size)
- 3 tbsp of maple syrup (I used maple-flavoured agave as I didn't have any!)



Instructions:
For the pie:
1. Unroll the pastry and leave to thaw according to the packaging instructions (mine suggested 60 minutes). During this time, cover the pastry in a sprinkling on cinnamon.
2. Put the pastry in a 20cm tart/cake tin if you have one, if not, try and find a similar-sized square tin with high sides. Trim off any excess pastry as it should come up to just above whatever tin you've put it in.
3. Pop the pumpkin, cream, muscovado sugar, nutmeg and ginger in a pan to simmer through. Simmer on a medium heat for around 20 minutes or until the pumpkin starts to soften (if you have a lot of carved out pumpkin rather than chopped up pieces, this is perfect for this recipe as it will all be blitzed soon anyway).
4. Pour the mixture into a blender and whizz it up until smooth. Leave the mixture cooling and go back to your pastry.
5. Heat your oven to 200c and cover the pastry with baking paper of foil. Pour baking beads in on top of the paper/foil and bake the pastry for 15 minutes (pro tip: if you don't have baking beads, dry rice works just as well and can be put back into packaging once used!)
6. Remove from the oven and remove the baking beads and paper. Bake the pastry once more for 5 minutes longer.
7. Pour your pumpkin puree mixture into a bowl and beat in 3 eggs and the melted butter.
8. Turn the oven down to 180c and pour the mixture into the pastry case. Fill it almost to the top but leave some crust showing! Cook for 30-40 minutes. You'll know when it's done if it wobbles like jelly in the middle.

For the cream:
1. Whisk the double cream in a bowl until it stiffens.
2. Beat in the maple syrup/maple syrup substitute. Spoon onto the top of a warm slice of pie and enjoy!



Pumpkin Seed Energy Balls - Vegan & Healthy Snack
Date energy balls are a firm favourite when it comes to snacks. I really enjoy making them with oats and almonds with some cacao powder as they're a good healthy alternative to having a chocolate biscuit with a cuppa, but these ones have a hint of festive spirit to them thanks to the cinnamon and nutmeg.

Calories: 80 per ball | Serving: 10-12 (depending on size)

Ingredients:
- 12 medjool dates
- 1 cup of pumpkin seeds
- 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon
- pinch of nutmeg
- cacao or cocoa powder to roll balls in if you've got a sweet craving!

Instructions:
1. Remove the pits from the dates and put them in a food processor.
2. Add in the pumpkin seeds, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Blitz the whole lot until it starts to combine and spin around the blender as a whole lump.
3. Separate the mixture into small handfuls and roll in the palms of the hand to make small balls.
4. Leave as is to chill in the fridge or roll them in some cacao or cocoa powder if you want some extra sweetness!



Pumpkin Enzyme Face Mask & Scrub - Vegan & Brightening
On top of the benefits I've already mentioned, pumpkin is great for the skin's surface too. The enzymes in pumpkin and the AHAs can increase cell turnover, smooth the skin and soften it. It is full of the antioxidants Vitamin A and Vitamin C which not only soften the skin but can also boost collagen production and thus, help with anti-ageing. This recipe is lush to put on when your skin is angry too. As it's a fresh natural face mask, you need to keep it in the fridge and use it within a week, so small batches are best. It's very cooling and will feel gently tingling on the skin as it helps blood flow to the surface of the skin. Add in some granulated sugar if you want to give it a scrubbing property too!

Ingredients:
- 1 large tbsp of pumpkin puree
- 1/2 tsp of cinnamon
- 1/2 tsp of ginger
- pinch of nutmeg
- 1 tbsp of honey (or agave to make it vegan)
- 1 tbsp of white granulated sugar (if making it a scrub!)

Instructions:
1. Put all of the ingredients in a bowl/jar and mix well.
2. Apply to the face and leave for 10-15 minutes.
3. Rinse and enjoy your baby-butt-soft face and glow!



Remember that if you're sat there with a whole lot of pumpkin on your hands, if you roast it for 1 hour on 180c and then peel away the skin, you can pop it all in a blender/liquidiser and make puree. Puree can then be used for *so* many recipes but best of all, it can be sealed in a container and kept in the freezer for a good 3-4 months so if you think you've got too much to use up fresh, freeze the rest for use during winter.

Lastly, if you've somehow got through this whole post and thought "hang on a minute, I don't even like pumpkin" or you are worrying about what you do with your carving once it's starting to collapse then, don't you worry. Popping your pumpkin outside whether it's at the bottom of the garden or even in your local park or woodland is a great, sustainable way to get rid of it because the animals love it. Whether we're talking about birds, badgers, squirrels, foxes... you name it, they'll wanna eat it. If you happen to have any of the seeds leftover, pop them outside too - there's no reason it's only the humans who should get to enjoy this time of year.

Happy Halloween!


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